• xkcrazy
    17 October 2014 at 02:10 #51045

    I’m looking for an engine and gearbox for my 3L 2door Lagonda.
    I know this will be a challenge ,especially living in Florida, but
    the car, LB 290 24, deserves to be refitted. All help is appreciated

    SRD
    18 October 2014 at 21:05 #51046

    Thanks for letting us know about your car, this is the first LB290 car after the LAG/50 series finished and a very early 3.0 dhc or Coupe. It was last recorded in the New York area in 1979, presumably complete.

    Do you have any further information or pictures you could email me privately for the club records. I have recorded below the details, including original registration number.

    The car was originally fitted with a 3.0 VB6J engine and of course a 4-speed DB gearbox.

    Kind regards

    Simon

    LB/290/ 24 ref: 1487 41954 Post-War DB3L OLJ 370 VB6J/86 2-door Tickford

    flat broke
    19 October 2014 at 13:55 #51047

    It would be great to see pictures and hear more about the car. Tough to get running gear but well worth it for a 2 door.
    I would estimate $20 to 30K U.S. for a servicable or rebuilt engine and gearbox. Did it have a Jag running gear previously?

    Tony

    SRD
    19 October 2014 at 20:23 #51048

    Tony – I* would suggest around or even a tad more than your higher figure of $30k US for a good 3.0 litre engine which turns over by hand; these are very hard to find, and better still with all ancillaries, including exhaust manifolds and carbs etc.

    A rebuilt engine is a different financial proposition, and they hit the market very rarely, and I would guess snapped up the DB2 folks.

    However, in the scheme of things the 3.0 2-door Coupes and dhc’s are the cars everyone wants, and they are now commanding very strong money for cars in top condition with correct engine and box.

    flat broke
    20 October 2014 at 02:33 #51049

    You are probably correct Simon. I have been putting together a spare drive train in the hope of saving a DHC or worthy saloon at some stage.
    Over the years I have managed to save a nice 2.6 engine complete with almost all ancillaries and a 3.0 with cracked block. Now that blocks are available, there is hope for that motor.

    mjpetersP24
    20 October 2014 at 14:31 #51050

    In response to the first entry in this chain:-

    If you would like to send me your contact information via this forum’s Members / Write email facility I will give your requirement a mention in The Lagonda Club’s monthly Gazette. Or, if you would like to join The Club you can place a wanted advert. in the Newsletter. I’m bound to say neither of which will increase your chance of success by much – as Simon and Tony indicate, these are scarce items – but perhaps by a little. Good luck.
    Martin

    xkcrazy
    21 October 2014 at 01:26 #51051

    I’m glad to see such enthusiastic support. To start, #24 is a 2 door saloon, or is that sport saloon, not a DHC. I prefer to think of car as being similar to Bentley Continental of that era. I have read the archival info from Aston Service Dorset, that 3L lagonda production started with LB290/24, so does that indicate the earlier cars with similar bodies are 2.6L? MY car did not have a driveline when I purchased it. I have a rebuilt Jag pushrod engine that will fit, if no other correct driveline can be found. Fortunately, the original carbs and intake manifolds were in the car. I have posted pictures on the postwar Lagonda web site

    Mark Whitehead
    21 October 2014 at 06:32 #51052

    Hi xj,
    I have a spare 3 litre gearbox, two in fact, Down Under.
    Regards,
    Mark

    SRD
    21 October 2014 at 14:05 #51054

    Thank you for your reply.

    The 3.0 production actually started much earlier with a batch of 16 cars from chassis LAG/50/461. These are known as “Brooklands” 2.6/3.0 litre cars. All were originally fitted with the 2.6 litre engine, and when the 3.0 litre became available in 1954, many had their engines changed by the works.

    These cars derive from 16 chassis’s that Brooklands purchased from AML and had Tickford make and fitted the new bodies on them

    See the following web-site for ample details on these cars, and a set of pages devoted to the 3.0 litre cars:

    http://www.db-lagonda.com/30-litre-cars

    The first Mk1 cars start at chassis LAG/50/532, which still exists

    The Aston Service details are incorrect.

    So your car is a Mk1 Sports Saloon or Coupe. These are rare and have a very nice shape and look and are also highly desirable.

    A super red Coupe is shown :

    http://www.db-lagonda.com/30-mk-1-coupe/

    this should give you idea of what they can look like.

    The club database will be updated with these details.

    Thank you for the reply.

    Simon

    flat broke
    21 October 2014 at 17:10 #51055

    As you can tell, Simon has collected a considerable amount of info on these cars and shares it on his site. My family have owned are 3 litre since the mid seventies however I have learned much about these cars in the last year thanks to him. As more people such as yourself pass on car details to Simon, the picture gets clearer. It does look like the 2 door 3 litre may be the rarest of the bunch?
    Back to your car, a couple of thoughts. Do you know much about its past history? There was a similar car for sale just east of Toronto about ten years ago. When I tried to track it down, it had been sold (without engine) and the story was it was headed back to the UK?
    I have seen one 4 door Saloon (now out West) that had a Jag engine and geabox fitted. Looked like a tidy conversion and no surgery to the car required. Not that this would be ideal, but if it gets you back on the road while you find the correct parts, it may make sense.
    The ongoing issue is that as the value of these cars rises, the Astons rise exponentially more. There are still DB2/4’s coming out of long term neglect that require engines. So there is stll demand for these parts that out strips (literally) the practicality of restoring the average Saloon.
    Don’t dismiss a 2.6 engine if you do come across one. The blocks are said to be better cast than the 3 litre and with a rebuild with uprated internals, you would be there. Ok so not numbers matching but not a huge deal IMHO.
    No sign of any pictures?
    Tony

    xkcrazy
    22 October 2014 at 02:08 #51056

    As far as known history for #24, The previous owner was a street rod builder that watched for “interesting” cars to convert. He acquired the car in 1992 and stored in a warehouse for a future project. IN 2007 I had a Chev Nomad that he wanted and worked out a trade. I have had some luck in obtaining some missing trim from online sources. Regarding trim, my car has the chrome strip at the door handle extending forward on the front fenders. I don’t see that on other cars pictured. Also, what is the bonnet chrome ornament/mascot representing?

    SRD
    22 October 2014 at 08:55 #51057

    Please can you post some pictures of your car on the forum, so we can see how it looks today.

    Thank you

    Simon

    xkcrazy
    23 October 2014 at 01:08 #51059

    I had posted three pictures on the post war Lagonda site. I will try to find them for posting here. The car is inside an 8X20 car hauler
    now, so difficult to get a good picture. I am contracting a TIG welder to make some body repairs, so I will be moving the car in the near future and more pictures will be made.

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